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Wednesday 21 February 2018
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Recourse to Sri Lanka’s domestic mechanism will mean surrendering justice and solution, warns Professor Manivannan

Recourse to Sri Lanka’s domestic mechanism will mean surrendering justice and solution, warns Professor Manivannan

Head, Department of Politics and Public Administration, University of Madras Professor Ramu Manivannan, who is currently attending the 29th regular session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva has said, resort to domestic mechanism with regard to alleged war crimes and human rights violations in Sri Lanka by the international community, can be seen as completely surrendering, not only justice for Tamils, but also surrendering political instrument of negotiated solution in Sri Lanka.

“My concern and record is that if internal mechanism could work in Sri Lanka then it could have worked in many more occasions in the last 65 years. Because, a nation must have certain precedence and conditions, both political culture and institutional mechanisms and constitutional mechanism. Sri Lanka does not have any of these. There are about more than thirteen commissions were established, but none of these commissions have indicted even a single person as guilty. In two occasions, they were pronounced as guilty, but none have been punished. Given the history of Sri Lanka in this manner, how can we trust a domestic mechanism? “Professor Manivannan said in an interview to The Tamil Diplomat from Geneva.

Manivannan also expressed serious concern as to the lack of one voice from the Tamil people on the political solution and justice seeking. “ If they are speaking in different voices, it clearly indicates the prejudiced personal self-interests of people and groups involved in steering this. They are falling in prey of the strategic manipulations of the Sri Lankan government. Tamil community in all over the world should speak in one voice, and not for any reason, but for the political solution and justice seeking“ he said.

When asked if the Human Rights Council is politicised and if it can do something to bring justice for Tamils, Manivannan briefly remarked, “UN or the Human Rights Council is highly politicised. Political priorities govern the outcome of the decisions. And, the political priorities also determine the voting pattern and behaviour. However, a question that we need to ask is ‘what is the extra ordinary concern of the international community   that can bring everyone together’. There are concerns, but nations see themselves in a different plans and platforms. But even under such kind of divisions, nations and international institutions such as Human Rights Council and Security Council have been able to bring about resolutions in the past. Then, why not Sri Lanka? Not because Tamils have political influence, but the seriousness of the issue. “

 


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